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Monthly Archives: October 2012

Attitudes of Health

I create my life!
I create the exact amount of my physical health and wellness.
I joyfully participate in physical activity – everyday.
My intention is to create health and abundance.
I admire and model fit and healthy people.
I believe that good health is important and possible, essential and invaluable.
Physical Activity creates good health and makes my life more enjoyable.
I get fit and stay healthy doing what I love.
I am truly grateful for all the health and wellness I have now.
Opportunities for physical activity always come my way.
I am physically fit. I am physically active because I choose to, not because have to.
I have enough physical strength and energy to participate in my desired lifestyle.
My good habits do well for me and provide me with more and more energy.
I decide to be fit so that I live long, live well, and inspire others to do the same.
I have abundant energy, vitality, and well-being.
I love and care for my body and it cares equally for me.
I enthusiastically take responsibility for my own health and wellness.
I am a physical fitness and health and wellness activist!
My good health is a wonderful gift which I never choose to sacrifice.
My capacity to enjoy my good health is limitless and expands day by day.

ACSM’s latest guidelines for Exercise Prescription

ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Prescription – Updated August 2011

Guidelines for improving cardiovascular and respiratory fitness:

Frequency: 150 minutes/week
Intensity/Time: 30-60 min of moderate 5x/week OR 20-60 min of vigorous 3x/week
Progression: Gradual
Other Information: one continuous session each workout day OR multiple sorter sessions of 10 minutes minimum are acceptable.

Guidelines for improving muscular fitness:

Frequency: 2-3x/week
Intensity/Time: 2-4 sets of either 8-12 reps for strength/power, 10-15 reps for older persons new to exercise or15-20 reps to improve endurance.  Light intensity for beginners or older adults.
Other Information: wait at least 48 hours between sessions

Guidelines for improving and maintaining flexibility:

Frequency: 2-3x/week
Intensity/Time: Hold each stretch 10-30 seconds to point of tightness or slight discomfort. Repeat 2-4x to accumulate 60 seconds per stretch. Static, dynamic, ballistic, or PNF (proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation) are appropriate.
Progression: Gradual
Other Information: warm up first before stretching

Guidelines for improving Neuromotor ability and function:

Frequency: 2-3x/week
Intensity/Time: 20-30 minutes/day
Progression: Gradual
Other Information: include motor skills (balance, agility, coordination, and gait), proprioceptive training, and tai chi, yoga, etc.

 

Split Routine Schedules for Weight Training

SPLIT ROUTINE SCHEDULES FOR WEIGHT TRAINING

*Remember to follow the general rule: allow 48 hours between working the same muscle groups!

UB – UPPER BODY
LB – LOWER BODY
FB – FULL BODY

3 DAY SPLITS:

M – FB
W – FB
F – FB

M – LB
W – UB
F – FB

M – PUSH
W – PULL
F – FB

M – UB
W – LB
F – UB
REVERSE PATTERN EVERY OTHER WEEK

M – PUSH
W – PULL
F – PUSH
REVERSE PATTERN EVERY OTHER WEEK

M – CHEST/TRICEPS
W – BACK/BICEPS
F – LEGS/SHOULDERS

4 DAY SPLITS

M – UB
T – LB
H – UB
F – LB

M – UB
T – LB
H – FB
SA – FB

M – PUSH
T – PULL
H – PUSH
F – PULL

M – PUSH
T – PULL
H – FB
SA – FB

M – PUSH
T – PULL
H – UB
F – LB

M -UB
T – LB
W – UB
F – FB
REVERSE UB/LB PATTERN EVERY OTHER WEEK

M – PUSH
T – PULL
W – PUSH
F – FB
REVERSE PUSH/PULL PATTERN EVERY OTHER WEEK

M – CHEST
T – BACK
H – LEGS
F – SHOULDERS/ARMS

M – CHEST/TRICEPS
T – BACK/BICEPS
W – LEGS/SHOULDERS
F – FB

M1 – CHEST/TRICEPS
T1 – BACK/BICEPS
H1 – LEGS/SHOULDERS
F1 – CHEST/TRICEPS
M2 – BACK/BICEPS
T2 – LEGS/SHOULDERS
H2 – CHEST/TRICEPS
F2 – BACK/BICEPS
M3 – LEGS/SHOULDERS
T3 – CHEST/TRICEPS
H3 – BACK/BICEPS
F3 – LEGS/SHOULDERS

5 DAY SPLITS

M – UB
T – LB
W – UB
H – LB
F – UB
REVERSE PATTERN EVERY OTHER WEEK

M – PUSH
T – PULL
W – PUSH
H – PULL
F – PUSH
REVERSE PATTERN EVERY OTHER WEEK

M – CHEST/TRICEPS
T – BACK/BICEPS
W – LEGS/SHOULDERS
F – UB
SA – LB

M – CHEST
T – BACK
W – SHOULDERS
H – LEGS
F – BICEPS/TRICEPS

6 DAY SPLITS

M – CHEST
T – BACK
W – LEGS
H – SHOULDERS
F – BICEPS/TRICEPS
S – LEGS

 

There is much debate in the nutrition realm as far as what is the “right” way to eat. Which method is correct?

While I will fail to provide you with a specific answer, I have a common sense test! Any diet must answer yes to all the following questions to pass:

1) Is it balanced?
A diet that recommends too high (or low) of any one macro-nutrient (fat, carbohydrate, protein, etc) doesn’t pass this test.

2) Does it allow moderation of all foods?
A glass of wine? Sure. A bottle every day? No. Ice cream as an occasional treat? Why not. Ice cream as a daily meal replacement? No.

3) Is it something you could sustain long term and remain in good health?
The best diet is a healthy one you can maintain for your entire life, not a restrictive fad you follow only temporarily.

When a client asks a diet related question, my first response is to ask them if it passes this test.

 

What are some of your current favorite lower body exercises?

Step Up – you can change the height in addition to the resistance for more intensity; add balance components through the use of medicine balls/sandbags/kettlebells and other upper body upward/outward/forward/rotational movements while balancing on one leg at the highest position.

Double Dynamic Lunge – a forward lunge followed by a back ward lunge without touching the foot down between the movements – after each rep, switch legs; or for an added challenge complete all reps on one side without touching your foot down while standing upright.

Barbell + Sandbag Squats – I like to add weighted sandbags to both sides of a standard barbell squat, it adds some variability and forces engagement of the core to prevent excessive shifting of the sandbags and maintain proper lifting technique.

 

Is there bone building benefit to walking with ankle and or hand weights?

Adding weight to the hands or ankles may significantly alter the natural gait of the participant; and thus the reason why I feel it is definitely not the best idea for most anyone, especially those that train intensely or competitively. A better idea to increase intensity (without having to run) would be to add a weight vest, add incline, or perhaps throw in some walking lunges or stationary squats every “x” number of minutes/miles/etc.

Any weight bearing exercise will provide the benefits of improving bone health. While using hand weight and ankle weights can certainly increase the intensity of a workout when walking, as well as help increase heart rate for those who cannot run or jog, the added weight is too insignificant to really see any additional improvement in bone density or bone health. In addition to cardiovascular type activities (running, stair stepping) results can also be had through traditional strength training.

 

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  •  

    Lose 10 pounds of body fat in one week!!!

    OK, before you go any further, let me inform you that this is yet another fitness myth. Read on to find out why.

    Let’s say that you hear about a new great diet that claims you can lose 10 pounds in one week. You want to lose weight so you imagine this could be the diet for you! Before you consider trying something similar to this scenario, let’s figure out if it’s in your best interest and if it will work right for you. What does it take to lose 10 pounds of fat in one week?

    1. We know that 1 pound of fat is approximately 3500 Calories.

    2. We know that to lose one pound of fat, you must actually use it. This goes back to high school physics. The second law of thermal dynamics states that mass is neither created nor destroyed. So, in order to get rid of fat off your body, you must use that stored energy to do work.

    3. Burning Calories (“work”) can be accomplished in several ways:

    • a) RMR – short for the Resting Metabolic Rate. This is the minimum amount of calories needed to sustain the vital functions of the body during a relaxed, reclined, and waking state Things like breathing, heart beating, digesting food and even thinking all require calories. Most people have a RMR that falls into a range of 1200 – 2500 Calories per day. Also note that things like aging, muscle mass, hormone activity, and starvation (often AKA “dieting”) influence our BMR. The best thing to do to increase your BMR is to exercise (aerobic and strength train) and eat enough. When we eat less than around 1200 Calories per day our RMR actually slows down.
      b) TEF – short for the Thermic Effect of Food. Different foods require different amounts of Calories to digest. For example, meats take longer to digest than crackers. TEF is responsible for approximately 5% (give or take) of your total daily caloric expenditure.
      c) TEE – short for the Thermic Effect of Exercise. Any activity we partake in requires energy to accomplish. Driving takes fewer Calories than running. TEE can add a few hundred to a few thousand extra Calories towards your total daily expenditure. Various forms of physical activity require more work (and thus more energy) than others; additionally the way in which you perform physical activity can have an impact on how much your metabolism is increased after your workout, but that is a topic for another day.
  • 4. Weight loss occurs only when the Calories you expend each day are more than you consume (eat).

    5. We can approximate how much weight loss would occur if we find your Calorie balance.

    • a) Calculate your Resting Metabolic Rate (you can find various formulas or calculators online, or use one HERE). Let’s say that your RMR is 1800 Calories per day.
      b) Calculate the amount of Calories you burn during your daily activities. This will depend on many activities – your occupation and other activities during your average day. Let’s pretend that you burn an extra 500 Calories doing these things.
      c) Calculate the amount of Calories you burn doing structured workouts or other exercises during your average day. This is easier for some activities (such as running, if you know how far and long you ran) than others, but additional calculators can be found online to provide estimates. Let’s say that you burn an average 200 extra Calories per day through exercise.
      d) Calculate the number of Calories you eat. Let’s pretend you eat 2000 Calories per day.

      Calories out:
      1800 (RMR) + 500 (Activity Level) + 200 (Exercise) = 2500 Calories per day.

      Calories in:
      2000

      Calorie Balance (Calories in minus Calories out):
      2000 – 2500 = -500 Calories. You are in a calorie deficit of 500 Calories.

      e) If 1 pound of fat is equal to 3500 Calories, it would take you 7 days (1 week) to lose 1 pound of body fat.
  • BOTTOM LINE: If someone lost 10 pounds of fat in one week, they would have to expend an extra 35,000 Calories that week, or be in a caloric deficit of 5,000 Calories per day. To achieve that in the example above, you would have to burn and extra 2500 Calories per day, and that’s if your diet consisted of eating NOTHING! Therefore, if someone really lost 10 pounds, they lost something other than fat.

     

    Calculating Daily Caloric Expenditure

    To figure our estimated daily caloric expenditure we need to calculate your RMR* (Resting Metabolic Rate), Daily Activity Level, and your average daily caloric expenditure from exercising.

    • Formula: Daily Caloric Expenditure = RMR + Activity Level + Exercise
  • Step 1: Calculating Caloric Expenditure from RMR

    • Men RMR = 66.473 + 13.751(BW) + 5.0033(HT) – 6.755(Age)
      Women RMR = 655.0955 + 9.463(BW) + 1.8496(HT) – 4.6756(Age)
      Provide your weight (kg), height (cm), and age (years AND months)
      Don’t forget to convert weight in pounds to kilograms and height in inches to centimeters!
      1 lb = 2.205 kg (Example: 150 pounds / 2.205 = 68 kg)
      1 inch = 2.54 centimeters (Example: 65 inches X 2.54 = 165.1 cm)
      1 month = .083 years (Example: 25 years 5 months = 25 + (5X.083) or 25.42 years)
  • Step 1 Alternate (Quick Estimate, not as accurate):

    • Men RMR = BW (in lb.) X 11 kcal
      Women RMR = BW (in lb.) X 10 kcal
  • Step 2: Calculating Caloric Expenditure from Daily Activity Level

    • Daily Activity Level = RMR X Activity Level Percentage
      Multiply RMR by the following percentages based on Activity Level:
    • Men Women
      Sedentary 15% 15%
      Lightly Active 40% 35%
      Moderately Active 50% 45%
      Very Active 85% 70%
      Exceptionally Active 110% 100%
    • Sedentary = inactive
      Lightly Active = most professionals, office workers, shop workers, teachers, homemakers
      Moderately Active = workers in light industry, most farm workers, active students, department store workers, soldiers not in active service, commercial fishing workers
      Very Active = full-time athletes and dancers, unskilled laborers, forestry workers, military recruits and soldiers in active service, mine workers, steel workers
      Exceptionally active = lumberjacks, blacksmiths, female construction workers
  • Step 3: Calculating Average Daily Caloric Expenditure from Exercise

    • Average Daily Caloric Expenditure from Exercise = Total Weekly Caloric Expenditure / 7
      Add total Weekly Caloric Expenditure from Exercise and divide by 7.
  • Step 4: Add Totals from Steps 1 through 3 (RMR + Activity Level + Avg. Daily Exercise)

    • Formula: Daily Caloric Expenditure = RMR + Activity Level + Exercise
  • *RMR: (Resting Metabolic Rate): Minimum amount of calories needed to sustain the vital functions of the body during a relaxed, reclined, and waking state. Note that RMR is different than BMR (Basic Metabolic Rate), which is amount of calories consumed while at complete rest (sleeping).

     

    What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

    Plantar Fasciitis is one of the most common orthopedic issues related to the foot and is defined as an inflammation of the thick tissue on the bottom of the foot that connects the heel bone to the toes and creates the arch of the foot. Plantar Fasciitis can develop when the tissues that create arch of the foot, the Plantar Fascia, is overstretched or overused as a result of many possible causes. Risk factors may include but are not limited to: less than ideal arch of the foot – either flat feet or too high of an arch, obesity or sudden weight gain, tight calf muscles and especially the tendons surrounding the foot and ankle, long distance running or prolonged standing or walking from occupational or other activities, and from shoes that have insufficient arch support or soft soles. Symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis most often include an either sharp or dull pain as well as stiffness under heel and throughout the arch of the foot. The pain can include tenderness, redness and swelling as well and is usually greatest during the morning or after inactivity, after repeated standing or sitting, while climbing stairs and after moderate to intense physical activity.

    Though most often affecting men and women over 40, Plantar Fasciitis can happen to anyone as there are many risk factors and common causes that may contribute to developing this condition. Depending on the situation, Plantar Fasciitis can occur more suddenly or develop over a longer period of time. Those who feel pain in the bottom of the heel and stiffness in the arch of the foot are often diagnosed with Plantar Fasciitis though other conditions must be ruled out before a diagnosis is complete. Heel spurs, stress fractures, and Achilles tendonitis are examples of conditions that are more likely to be present in addition to Plantar Fasciitis; while other issues affecting the foot like diabetes, leprosy, and peripheral neuropathy are much less linked to having or developing Plantar Fasciitis. While many people may have a genetic predisposition to developing this condition – such as an excessive high arch or flat foot – most other risk factors are influenced by your environment, occupation, and behaviors.

    If you have been diagnosed with Plantar Fasciitis, there is a wide assortment of short and long term treatment options available to you. Treatment may last a few short months or even a few years, though the average treatment time is around 8-10 months. It is first very important to rest as much as possible for 1-2 weeks after being diagnosed with the condition. Over the counter medicines such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen and the application of ice to the affected area a couple times a day for 10-15 minutes may help alleviate any associated pain and swelling. Doctors may also recommend using night splints that help stretch and heal the Plantar Fascia, or wearing a boot cast for up to 6 weeks, and sometimes a steroid injection into the heel to relieve more extreme or prolonged pain. If these treatment options don’t alleviate most of your symptoms, surgery to relieve the pain and release the tight tissues may be considered.

    Wearing proper shoes, especially during physical activity or prolonged walking, sitting, or standing may be one of the most important steps you can take to prevent Plantar Fasciitis. Shoe inserts, particularly those prescribed by an orthopedist or chiropractor may help prevent the condition from happening or at least minimize the chance for more intrusive actions needed such as surgery or steroid injections. Maintaining foot flexibility, and to a lesser extent lower and upper leg flexibility is also a great way to prevent Plantar Fasciitis and other related foot issues or injuries. Improving ankle mobility without compromising stability and stretching the muscles of the lower leg can be completed through various stretch positions. All of these prevention tactics can be implemented immediately and can help you maintain healthy (and happy!) feet so that you can sustain your preferred activity level and desired lifestyle.

    OTHER RESOURCES:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0004438/

    http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/plantar-fasciitis-topic-overview

    http://www.medicinenet.com/foot_pain/article.htm

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/plantar-fasciitis/DS00508